KANKANIM: Sugiyot Mikra'iyot Bemabat Rav Tehumi [HEBREW]

KANKANIM: Sugiyot Mikra'iyot Bemabat Rav Tehumi [HEBREW]
    Price: $20.00

    Code: Kankanim

    Weight: 1.00 kilograms



    KANKANIM: Sugiyot Mikra'iyot Bemabat Rav Tehumi [HEBREW]


    by Rabbi Moshe Pinchuk

    Softcover, 320 pages
    Danacode: 563-16
    publication: 2009


    This book offers a new approach to the analysis of biblical stories. The contribution lies in two areas: a new point of departure and different exegetical assumptions. There are many books extant which deal with biblical analysis, however they all have self imposed limitations regarding methods and sources they employ. For example, books penned as "academic research" would use only such methods and tool accepted in the academic realm. They do not recognize the value of other methods or sources. Conversely, Rabbinic authors carefully guard their pale, employing only sources and methods they recognize. The rabbinic world itself is subdivided into Hasidic exegesis, Kabbalistic exegesis etc., each perpetuating its insularity. In this sense, "Kankanim" is the fruit of multidisciplinary analysis. The working assumption is that insights from one discipline can shed light and help solve problems in another discipline. Methods, tools and sources from many and diverse areas were used in the analysis. We have demonstrated that methods and sources from distinct and unlike areas can fuse in harmony and yield impressive results in biblical analysis. This result also contains a sociological message, the Bible and Jewish tradition are not under the sole ownership of any particular stream within Judaism, it is equally relevant and accessible to all. The exegetical assumptions are also unique. First, an attempt has been made to understand the motives and actions from their point in history, omitting the advantage of retrospect (others would call this prophecy) in understanding them. The assumption is that at the time of occurrence, the biblical figures were unaware of the future meaning of their actions. Second, in the study of history one is trained never to ask, "What would have happened if"? in our analysis we have found this question to be quite prolific.